The missed opportunity in resourcing

Recruitment and resourcing fascinates and perturbs me in equal measure. Of all the areas of the HR lifecycle it is the one that tends to have the highest volume of opinions per capita and the lowest proportion of data. Which is peculiar, because it probably contains the richest opportunity of all to really hone the science of Human Resource Management.

At the recent TREC conference I was talking to Matthew Syed the author of Bounce and Black Box Thinking. He made a point which I found compelling and scarily obvious at the same time.

Consider a key hire:

We go through our recruitment process, we measure our KPIs, we long list, short list, assess and finally appoint. Three month later, six months later, the manager is happy with the hire.

That’s good right? We’ve made a brilliant appointment?

But compared to what?

What about the person you didn’t appoint? Surely that is the best comparator? Where are they now, what are they doing and how will their career progress? Do you measure the lost opportunity and what is the vested interest in measuring the “successful” candidate, successfully?

I also see this closed mindset in relation to technology, candidate experience, candidate management and pretty much every single aspect of resourcing. We are quick to make opinions, quick to justify opinions and slow to challenge our own preconceptions about successful or unsuccessful interventions.

I witnessed a debate on Facebook about using interview on demand technology (video interviewing). Left and right there were opinions being launched, most of them damning. The thing that struck me was that no-one there was offering any experience or data about usage, just their own opinions. Which is fine, but in a world where we are trying to show the relevance of our profession, shouldn’t we do better than, “I think”?

Measurement and data in the field of HR is notoriously difficult, we are awash with the bad and the dodgy. That will only change if we are willing to be open minded, curious and willing to challenge ourselves and our own preconceptions – nowhere more than in the field of recruitment and resourcing.

In order to get better, we need to listen and learn as much as show and tell. That requires a specific mindset and approach – one that we need to be checking for when we hire people to recruit in our name.

Inclusion means acceptance

I’m going to let you in to some secrets, just don’t tell anyone you heard this from me….

  • Not everybody wants to work flexibly. Some people like being in the office every day.
  • There are people who come to work each day for the money. They don’t care who for.
  • Some people don’t want to be promoted, their ambition is to be left alone to do their job.
  • Self development doesn’t have to be about work. Some people learn all the time without you.

I could go on….

The thing is, just because we think it’s valuable, doesn’t mean it is.

As HR professionals, as professionals in the world of work we have to be incredibly careful that we don’t affirm our own and our professional biases on the workplace. We happily argue that we need to be more flexible, that we need to develop flexible organisations, but then we tell people that we’ve benchmarked our pay and that we are a median to top quartile payer and look with disdain at anyone who suggests they should have more. Why is one more important to us than the other?

We talk about inclusivity, without realising that means we need to create the environment that allows people to value the things that we don’t. That it means we need to accept that not everything will conform to the HR 101 Model Workplace and that we will need to accommodate a genuine breadth of needs and requirements.

Who says the person that needs extra money in order to pay for their family to go on holiday is more unreasonable, less worthy or more indulgent than the person who asks for flexible working to spend a day at week at home with theirs?

Who says that the person that comes in at 9 and leaves at 5 and doesn’t want to attend any of the learning and development courses, but spends their evenings learning different languages, has less potential than their colleague that takes any opportunity to advance their career?

When we think about the world of work, when we think about our organisations and workplaces, we need to check ourselves and ask which lens we’re looking through. Are we really making decisions that allow all to benefit? Or just the ones that we agree with.

The HR diagnostic

So here’s a test for you…..

Think of an area of HR (it could be resourcing, talent development, compensation etc).

Argue why it adds value to the organisation.

Argue why YOU need to do it, not anyone else.

Define the value that is being added by doing it (qualitative and quantitative).

Then,

Argue why it slows the organisation down, makes things harder.

Argue why it could be better done by someone else.

Define the total cost of doing the activity (time and budget).

Compare the two.

What did you learn?

 

Language matters

People at work will often tell me that, “words are important”. I agree, I think language is important and the power of it is underused in a work context. For some reason, the moment we enter the workplace we seem to lose all sense of the human vocabulary that we would normally use to interact with people and develop an entirely different language.

It sucks.

But that’s not really today’s point, I could write diatribe after diatribe on the stupidity of business speak – but neither you nor I have time. No, what really annoys me is the passive dominant language that people use;

“I know you’re on holiday, but” 

I know you’re on holiday, but my issue is more important than your relaxation time….

ICYMI

I am going to assert that whatever piece of nonsense I am propogating is actually something that you would want to read. You cannot possibly have chosen not to read it….

FYI

I think this information is important, I don’t give a shit what you think….

I could go on.

Next time you’re talking to someone, writing to someone, thinking of using any words for any purpose, try to think about the reader. Try for once not to write for yourself, think about yourself or your need. Think about the individual, what do they need, want, desire?

If what you’re writing is interesting, useful and helpful enough, the reader will come to you. And for the love of God. Please stop with the passive dominant phrases.