Getting stuff done

I was pondering this weekend on the essence of getting things done at work. Organisations are brilliant at creating structures and processes that are well-intentioned but can ultimately get in the way of actual activity. When things aren’t working the way we want, we lay another process on top to try to make sure that we get the intended result.

All of which led me to sketch out the following:

Getting stuff done

Which I think lays out the fundamentals of successful organisational activity.

Ultimately we want to have strong data and insight that allows us to understand the challenges and the options available. We need simple decision-making forums that allow the data to be discussed and actions agreed, which then have clear ownership. Wrapped around this we need to have an acceptance of accountability, responsibility for performance and the need to communicate and collaborate.

Everything else is just noise.

Seems simple when you write it out like that, doesn’t it? Or maybe I’ve missed something along the way.

Getting the job done

When my kids were little I’d ask them to clear the table. In response they’d take their plates and put them on the side. As they grew older and with a little direction, they learnt to take other peoples’ plates too and maybe put the salt and pepper back in the cupboard. As young adults now, I consider it a win if on asking them to clear the table, they take the plates, cutlery and glasses and put them in the dishwasher, tidy away the condiments and wipe the table clear of any stains or spills.

The same instruction, different interpretations of completion.

Throughout our lives we are faced with tasks , some we are given and some we give to others. How often as leaders do we have a clear vision of completion without a clear articulating of the outcomes that we want to see? And how often do we find ourselves frustrated when we complete a task, only to be told that it doesn’t meet the requirements of others?

Our ability to successfully contract is critical to collaboration, to organisational efficiency and to the effective delivery of goals. We have to balance the clarity that we need to achieve desired outcomes, with the empowerment that is required to ensure engaged, motivated teams working with forward momentum. It’s a tricky balance. And of course, the onus is not on one party, but all of those involved.

So next time you’re handing out a task, project or objective, or alternatively next time you’re being asked to complete one. Consider what assumptions you’re making about the outcomes that you think are required. Have you clearly articulated what’s important and what is free to be determined? Being specific and clear at the beginning might take a little more time and thought, but ultimately it will improve the performance of your organisation or team.

Time out!

As the schools start to break up, thoughts turn to the summer holidays and, for many, their only true break from the world of work. Whether travelling away, staying with friends or family, or simply taking time out at home, a holiday is an important and valuable part of the employment deal and an individual’s wellbeing.

I’ve written before about the weird passive aggressive behaviour that tends to go on before the Christmas break, the key connection being our ability to demonstrate respect for one another. When someone is on holiday, they’re on holiday. Go back 30 years and we would have had absolutely zero opportunity to contact someone who had chosen to go away. Did businesses still run? Of course they did.

Just because we can, doesn’t mean we should. But the responsibility sits on both sides of the fence, the boss that wants to know everything and prevents decisions being made in their absence is as bad as the one that contacts their employees when they’re trying to take a break.

Of course there are emergencies and exceptions, I’m not being overly purist about this, but for the large part the success of  a leader is their ability to build teams who can survive prosper and be successful in their absence. The desire to always be involved or the need to have to be involved are both signs of imperfection within the system.

And at the heart of it, annual leave is an employee benefit. It is hard to think of any other benefit that one would give and then demand a bit back. “Your pension contribution is normally 10%, but this month we’ve reduced it to 8% to help us pay for an answer to a question we couldn’t work out on our own.” It just doesn’t make sense.

Whether you’re going on holiday or have team that are going away,  ask yourself what you need to do to get the most from it, to allow everyone time to relax and recharge. You can’t change the behaviours of others, but you can always be a role model whatever your position within a team. Taking time out is as important as contributing fully when you’re in – we should be mindful to treat it that way.

 

 

7 tips for better HR practice

  1. Express a view – don’t fall into the trap of, “it’s my position to advise, you make the choice”. Not only does this annoy managers, it also disempowers you and makes you inessential. Why bother asking you if that’s all you do? Don’t be afraid to express a view and explain why you feel that way, even if others don’t agree no-one will ever disrespect you for having an opinion.
  2. See the person – its easy to get into the view that you need to be commercial, tough and driving the agenda of “the business” and forget about the primary aspect of your role. You can be all of these things and still see the human impact. Never forget to see the person in all choices and decisions, that is your unique lens.
  3. Don’t hide behind policy – similarly to “only advising”, hiding behind policy disempowers you. We know that there are good reasons to have policies, but you need to be able to explain why they’re appropriate and useful, not just quote them. Most decisions will always lie in the margins.
  4. Avoid the gossip – you will be party to important, confidential information throughout your career and how you use it and react to it will determine your professionalism. Avoid gossip at all costs, lead with integrity and dignity and never ever use knowledge as power.
  5. Write for your mum – when you commit anything into writing, ask yourself how you would feel if your mum or dad, or significant other were to receive the letter. Is it clear, does it show the tone and warmth you want it to? Could someone understand it who had no technical knowledge or background? Does it make sense?
  6. Seek to understand – in pretty much any situation there will be information and then THE information. Seeking to understand, to explore and asking good questions will help you to better lead a situation. Assume not only makes an ass out of u and me, it also leads to poor decisions.
  7. Language matters – You are not HR and they are not THE BUSINESS. End of.